r/Damnthatsinteresting Interested Aug 06 '22 Helpful 13 Narwhal Salute 1 Wholesome 8 Silver 10 Gold 1 Mind Blown 1

Soldiers saved by bacteria. Image

/img/dm5g8yz0o4g91.jpg

[removed] — view removed post

97.4k Upvotes

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u/dragonti Aug 06 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

Photorhabdus luminescens is the bacteria, if anyone is curious. It has a symbiotic relationship with, and lives in the gut of a parasitic nematode.

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u/RollinThundaga Aug 06 '22 Wholesome Seal of Approval Starstruck

Aka, the nematodes came up from the dirt overnight looking for a snack, vomited their symbiotes onto the open wounds to get the meal cooking, ate them back up and went back to base.

In the course of this, the symbiotes digested the bad bacteria, partially sterilizing the wounds.

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u/[deleted] Aug 06 '22 edited Aug 07 '22 Silver

The boys who won award in 2001 concluded that the bacteria, along with the nematodes, got into the soldiers’ wounds from the soil. This not only turned their wounds into night lights, but may have saved their lives. The chemical cocktail that P. luminescens uses to clear out its competition probably helped kill off other pathogens that might have infected the soldiers’ wounds.

Pretty Interesting Story

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u/RaynSideways Aug 06 '22

That is incredible. Kind of horrifying, but incredible. Imagine being so unbelievably dirty that some of the filth actually cleans some of the other filth.

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u/Theverybestversion Aug 07 '22

"We call it Three Stooges Syndrome."

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u/HilariousScreenname Aug 07 '22

Indestructible....

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u/chassmasterplus Aug 07 '22

No sir. Actually, the slightest breeze could-

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u/Landscaper_97 Aug 07 '22

Mr Burns, such a great character

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u/Jinackine_F_Esquire Aug 07 '22

TIL there exists in nature a dirtiness envelope. Eventually, you max out the dirt and the dirt is only dirt to the other dirt.

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u/newpinksink Aug 07 '22

Spilled bacon grease on myself during burning man. Can confirm, dirt (playa) good. No burn. Not even too warm.

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u/Jinackine_F_Esquire Aug 07 '22

Hey man that's actually a gem. Obviously I'm not going to go seek out needs for mud armor but if I ever need to play with fire and there's mud, I'll try to think of this!

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u/Ratatoski Aug 07 '22

I use this strategy with washing my car. If I wash it it'll look dirty in a week. If I don't wash it it'll look the same for at least two years before it starts slowly getting into growing algae territory :)

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u/EmeraldBrosion Aug 07 '22

You gotta go drive around in places where there is snow after the algae, I feel like there is a new species to be found when combining your progressive filth with road salts

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u/Longjumping_College Aug 07 '22

That's penicillin, a mold so strong that bacteria can't keep up enough strength to survive in humans.

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u/RollinThundaga Aug 07 '22

Until it can resist penicillin, and we introduce methicillin.

And then we get stuff like MRSA, who we don't have another antibiotic to respond to.

The modern medicinal arms race

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u/SchwiftySqaunch Aug 07 '22

Then we counter with bacteriophages

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u/rutuu199 Aug 07 '22

If that's what it sounds like, is it a virus that targets bacteria?

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u/SchwiftySqaunch Aug 07 '22

Exactly. Here's a neat video explaining it a bit

https://youtu.be/YI3tsmFsrOg

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u/DeadDollKitty Aug 07 '22

I did a project where I wrote a mock SBIR about a genetically engineered bacteriophage and how it could target MRSA. I think it could be done, just need someone smarter than me with more funds to do it.

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u/itchynipz Aug 06 '22

Thank

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u/Sacred4skin Aug 06 '22

Are your nips still itchy

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u/Spoonman88 Aug 06 '22

Is your foreskin still sacred?

134

u/Acute_Procrastinosis Aug 06 '22

Do you prefer to be big or little?

114

u/furlonium1 Aug 06 '22

Did you put off coming up with this response?

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u/hysys_whisperer Aug 06 '22 Silver

You're only on here posting because you're out of work.

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u/lo5t_horiz0n Aug 06 '22

Speak up there, I can't hear you

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u/Prineak Aug 06 '22

What is happening

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u/WaitHowDidIGetHere92 Aug 06 '22

I'm just as confused as you are.

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u/HereForTheQueso2 Aug 06 '22

Same. I thought this was a cheese party

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u/eatingmypoop Aug 06 '22

I'm eating my poop.

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u/Floofy_Fox_Gal Aug 06 '22

More confused that the first 91 of you?

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u/yoyowarrior Aug 06 '22

Check the usernames, you'll have your answer

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u/Knucklebum Aug 06 '22

Little for sure

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u/[deleted] Aug 06 '22 edited Aug 06 '22

[deleted]

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u/SleepySeeds Aug 06 '22

Are your man’s still spoony?

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u/k_50 Aug 06 '22

Do you cum in your sleep?

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u/Exploding_Testicles Aug 06 '22

Still like playing the spoons?

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u/_Exordium Aug 06 '22

Still uhh... have yer nards?

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u/FamilyStyle2505 Aug 06 '22

Thankee Sai

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u/arsmorendi Aug 06 '22

Long days and pleasant nights.

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u/Xaqv Aug 06 '22

The irony since this was on the Tenn./Miss. state line, they were Confederate nematodes saving Union soldiers.

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u/NowheyYahweh Aug 06 '22

I'm pretty sure the Nematodes didn't enlist either way.

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u/Xaqv Aug 06 '22

So there would have been no peer pressure from fellow roundworms to support the Confederacy? What about annelids that were sympathetic to their home soils? It’s well known that many Southern soldiers were infested with tapeworms!

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u/AppearanceBig1053 Aug 06 '22

Nematodes are famously extremely racist.

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u/JessoRx Aug 06 '22

Wow, and the luminescence attracts the next victim.

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u/thedoomdevice Aug 06 '22

Glow bros! High five!

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u/myjupitermoon Aug 06 '22

Just let your soul glow.

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u/IfonlyIwasfunnier Aug 06 '22

“So you know, he comes home and, ‘Mom, you’re working with a glowing
bacteria. Could that have caused the glowing wounds?’” Martin told
Science Netlinks. “And so, being a scientist, of course I said, ‘Well,
you can do an experiment to find out.’”

uhhhh...poor kid...

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u/chappy0215 Aug 06 '22

Thank you for the succinct nature of this response.

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u/______DEADPOOL______ Aug 06 '22

I still think it's part of Venom's symbiote hive...

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u/getoffrobbie Aug 06 '22

I remember when your specific username was somewhat of a celebrity here on reddit. Nice to see you're still active.

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u/Incandescent_Lass Aug 06 '22

Hmmmm I’ll stick to bloodletting, thanks though

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u/plipyplop Aug 06 '22

Have you given any thought to that new quicksilver I've seen on the daguerreotypes?

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u/Dopplegangr1 Aug 06 '22

I'll stick to a cocktail of whiskey, cocaine and heroin

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u/Fancy_Mammoth Aug 06 '22

Glowing humans, symbiotes... Pretty sure those are Goa'Ulds

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u/eggimage Aug 06 '22

the ‘todes puked on people and they thanked them for it, i do it at olive gardens and they banned me from all the branches

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u/Prestigious_Plum_451 Aug 06 '22

Sounds like what one sees with maggot therapy. The grubby critters eat the dead tissues, and bacteria helping to keep the wound clean, and they also produce some enzymes that not only inhibit bacterial growth, but help promote healing otherwise.

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u/canaryhawk Aug 06 '22

How would one go about patenting this process to facilitate its sale at $10,000 a dose? Asking for a friend.

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u/FormerFetus2 Aug 06 '22

Rare to see Chaotic Good in nature.

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u/FistingLube Aug 06 '22

So you're saying hot soapy water would have also cleaned the wounds?

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u/RollinThundaga Aug 06 '22

Sure, but you're not gonna find much of that on a pitched post-Crimean battlefield at night.

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u/Tuna_Sushi Aug 06 '22

Everyone in my department is a parasitic nematode.

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u/fake_physicist Aug 06 '22

Lol this bacteria produces toxins thar kill insects which the nematode then eats. One of those toxins is produced through the expression of a gene called makes caterpillars floppy.

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u/sawdustandfleas Aug 07 '22

I thought you were kidding! It really IS called makes caterpillars floppy lmao

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u/mikiekwoods Aug 06 '22

O wee ooo, killer nemu!

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u/Sarconic Aug 06 '22

Doug would be 42 by now.

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u/onlyonerule Aug 06 '22

I almost downvoted you because that factoid hurts my feelings.

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u/SeaGroomer Aug 06 '22

Roger Klotz became an alcoholic police officer for sure. Skeeter died of cancer a few years back.

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u/THElaytox Aug 06 '22

my favorite part of the wikipedia article: "P. luminescens also produces a proteic toxin through the expression of a single gene called makes caterpillars floppy (mcf)."

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u/dragonti Aug 06 '22

It's always nice to see humor in science. The fact that the "sonic hedgehog" gene is one of the most crucial genes during development will never not make me smile.

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u/BearCorp Aug 06 '22

I like your funny words, magic man

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u/Camelfoe Aug 06 '22 edited Aug 06 '22 Silver

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u/BIGHAFFNER Aug 06 '22

2.3. “Makes Caterpillars Floppy” Toxins

The “makes caterpillars floppy” toxins 1 (Mcf1) and 2 (Mcf2) act upon injection [6,13,25] and they are encoded by PAI II [11,12], along with other hemagglutinin-like proteins. Mcf1 has been shown to promote apoptosis in the midgut, producing a characteristic “floppy” phenotype in the infected insect, as well as in mammalian cells [26]; it mimics BH3 domain proteins that are found in mitochondria and have proapototic actions [13] as in its N-terminal domain, this protein has a Bcl2-homology 3-like domain (BH3 domain). Its central domain is of hydrophobic character with high similarity of the translocation domain of the Clostridium difficile toxin B, while the C-terminal domain of Mcf1 resembles the repeats-in toxin (RTX) like toxins of another bacterium (Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae)

science bihtch

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u/dontshoot4301 Aug 06 '22

I now realize the reason they use Latin is because everyone would be giggling the whole class if we used the English name

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u/wikipediabrown007 Aug 07 '22

Makus caterpillarum floporum

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u/SaintsSooners89 Aug 07 '22

It's Makus caterpillarum floporummm -Hermione

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u/Haxorz7125 Aug 07 '22

How can you read this? there’s no pictures!

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u/Lone_Wolf_Forest Aug 07 '22 Silver

I was hunting today for anything that could verify the plausibility of this post and just wanted to share this where it would be read. In a quarterly journal of science from 1821 a man named Baron Percy documented phosphorescence on the wounds of a few soldiers. It was before the Civil War but it was documented. It’s the only source I could find of glowing wounds on soldiers and it’s actually quite fascinating to read. Here’s the link:

https://books.google.at/books?id=ryxGAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA180&dq=%E2%80%9CPhosphorescence+of+wounds%E2%80%9D

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u/PuckFutin69 Aug 07 '22

The MVP right here

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u/KE1tea Aug 06 '22

FLOPPY CATERPILLARS
I love this

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u/bookluvr83 Aug 06 '22

I can't stop giggling at that name

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u/Delicious_Subject_91 Aug 07 '22

Props to whoever named the thing what it does.

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u/Groudover Aug 07 '22

God I love Reddit

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u/MmmmMorphine Aug 07 '22

He's already equivalent to a 60W bulb. I'm sorry. He probably won't make it.

On the other hand, check out what happens when we cover him with caterpillars! ...What do you mean why?

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u/[deleted] Aug 06 '22

I used the bacteria to destroy the bacteria

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u/Anonymous150806 Aug 06 '22

And it nearly killed me

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u/[deleted] Aug 06 '22

And That is Destiny Fulfilled.

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u/Radi0ActivSquid Aug 06 '22

Look at that. Blood toxicity perfectly balanced.

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u/Selfimprovementguy91 Aug 06 '22

As all things should be

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u/diffcalculus Aug 06 '22

Fine. I'll do it myself.

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u/TheFluffiestFur Aug 07 '22

I don’t even know who you are.

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u/duaneap Interested Aug 06 '22

What did it cost you?

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u/Putnum Aug 06 '22

The only way to kill a bad bacteria is to give a good baceria a payrise or something

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u/Single-Bodybuilder31 Aug 06 '22

The bacteria served no purpose beyond temptation

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u/yedd Aug 06 '22

This is essentially what is going on in your guts permanently, the ones we like out-compete the ones we don't.

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u/JarlaxleForPresident Aug 06 '22

That’s why I don’t trust Star Trek transporters.

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u/notLOL Aug 06 '22

This is basically how fertile soil works. You don't want disease bacteria to overpower the soil around your plants. You want predatory bacteria that eat the bacteria that muck up the bioprocesses of your healthy plant's roots.

The exploding and melting of the bacteria introduce water soluble nutrients to the roots and soil around the roots that are locked in bacteria. The roots also excrete sugars. This basically feeds microbes in the soil. Then predatory microbes open them up and eat those bacteria. Its a messy moist pool of life and death.

The soil acts like the gut of the plant world. Our guts are full of bacteria that live symbiotically with humans.

In any case YSK tossing salads is not at all the same thing in these two similar contexts

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u/Larry-fine-wine Aug 06 '22

Xzibit: Yo dawg, I heard you like bacteria.

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u/RustyCrawdad Aug 06 '22 Wholesome

A war where brother fought brother created a war where bacteria fought bacteria.

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u/BelleAriel Aug 06 '22

This is true.

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u/buttered00toast Aug 06 '22

Keen observation, pretty neat-o.

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u/WeAreBeyondFucked Aug 06 '22

that's far out and tubular

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u/IntrinsicGiraffe Aug 06 '22

What if bacteria are simply piloting us for war?

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u/arcaneresistance Aug 06 '22

Achievement Unlocked

The Meaning of Life

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u/tommasz Aug 06 '22

They were lucky the doctors didn't get to them first.

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u/ChristianLW3 Aug 06 '22

Still shocking how primitive medicine science was back then

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u/TheFrostyGoat Aug 06 '22

Its been 108 years since WW1

The amount of advancement since then has been astronomical considering how short 108 years is in the long run

WW1 and WW2 propelled the medical field rather rapidly

Just a random opinion of a random internet brah

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u/XDreadedmikeX Aug 06 '22

WWI and WWII propelled EVERYTHING. Its no coincidence we started going into space shortly after

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u/TheFrostyGoat Aug 06 '22

This is true too

Who knew mass genocide of our species would have a plus down the road /s

definitely gave us an incentive compared to if we where a more passive and on hostile species i feel

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u/MasterDump Aug 06 '22

Industrialization of warfare. Everything had to and naturally kept up. What a fucked scenario.

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u/TheFrostyGoat Aug 06 '22

Pretty much

I guess the duality of human kind is we are sometimes incrediably efficient and innovative

But it sometimes gets bent to not so great things

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u/idiotic_melodrama Aug 06 '22

Several of humanity’s fastest periods of major progression happened after a MASSIVE number of deaths. Mostly plagues, but also WWII.

One major theory for why is that insane reduction of the work force causes labor to be in high demand. The necessary increase in wages leads to a move towards wealth equality which leads to massive investment in all manner of technology.

Of course, eventually a new group of oligarchs takes over and suppresses progress and induces stagnation. And that stagnation eventually caused plagues and unrest until another mass death event occurs.

In my opinion, COVID has kicked off our next major mass death event. COVID has already affected the work force across the world, Monkeypox is fast in its heels, Russia is in Ukraine, China is making threats towards Taiwan, and we’ve got a fascist takeover in America.

Not the end of the world, but definitely something major is possible. It remains to be seen if technology has progressed enough to forestall what seems inevitable.

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u/invitelongbug Aug 06 '22

All this and all we got were NFT’s…

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u/foodank012018 Aug 06 '22

And more than half the time they're still guessing what your problem is today.

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u/TheFrostyGoat Aug 06 '22

Lol true

To be fair we pretty whack one of us can die from falling the wrong way

another can survive multiple gunshot wounds or a bullet to the head in rare cases

Things that would doom other animals we can bounce back from or even replace lost pieces/transplant organs

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u/celticsupporter Aug 06 '22

I'm going to apply some leeches here to get the ghosts out of your blood. Take this prescription of heroin to help with the pain and if that works too well I'm going to prescribe this cocaine to counteract. If you survive the night feel free to contact me with any questions.

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u/LadiesLoveMyPhD Aug 06 '22

I highly recommend the PBS documentary Cancer: Emperor of All Maladies for a good take on how medicine has advanced. From cutting out all breast muscle tissue to targeted cancer therapies, pretty insane. I'm excited for the day we look back and chemotherapy and think it's insanely barbaric.

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u/pedroah Aug 06 '22

Dialysis!? My god. What is this? The dark ages?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ssq8wHAx4nE

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u/gs12 Aug 06 '22

Haha

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u/-9AAA6- Aug 06 '22

Civil War medicine was of much higher quality than is often portrayed. Battlefield medical interventions, although not meeting our modern expectations, saved many lives.

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u/pole_assassin Aug 06 '22

Cut off his arm and give him some heroin.

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u/humblepotatopeeler Aug 06 '22

if i was saved by a luminescent bacteria back in the 1800s, i would be 100% sure god intervened and that god exists.

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u/flashmedallion Aug 07 '22

That was my first thought. These dudes would have spent the rest of their lives saying "Hey thanks for that God, that was extremely legit"

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u/KhaineVulpana Aug 07 '22

I would have been trying to shoot lightning from my fingers until the day I died.

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u/Walshy231231 Aug 07 '22

Sufficiently advanced science/knowledge is indistinguishable from magic

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u/UrbanGM Aug 06 '22 All-Seeing Upvote

The only answer for bad bacteria is good bacteria...with a gun.

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u/nz_reprezent Aug 06 '22

Guns don’t kill bacteria. Bacteria kill bacteria.

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u/jsamke Aug 06 '22

Only if there are too many doors in your body

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u/Dick_snatcher Aug 06 '22

Mouth, anus. That's two

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u/myjupitermoon Aug 06 '22

Nose, eyes, ears, vagina, urethera, sweat glands? So many doors.

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u/Radi0ActivSquid Aug 06 '22

There's always a relevant XKCD

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u/good_guy_with_a_pun Aug 06 '22

I’m not necessarily pro-bacteria, but I am pro-biotics

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u/TnTitan1115 Aug 06 '22

I live near where this happened, the battle.

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u/wunderbraten Aug 06 '22

did you try growing the bacteria on you?

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u/TnTitan1115 Aug 06 '22 Helpful Ally

I can't even get hair to grow on my head.

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u/SurrogateHair Aug 06 '22

Only because you haven't grown the bacteria on your head

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u/PM_me_your_whatevah Aug 06 '22

I’m sure there’s some sort of mold that looks like hair. Maybe put that on your head.

Or just be bald and don’t give a shit. Make sure to use sunscreen though. A burn on a bald head feels like the pain goes all the way through your skull. Not fun.

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u/l_dupa Aug 06 '22

You really made my day 🤣

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u/grizzlebonk Aug 06 '22

It's interesting, the battle.

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u/CGFROSTY Aug 06 '22

The bacteria were having their own civil war.

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u/DrunkSpiderMan Aug 06 '22

It's poetic! POETIC!

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u/weetabixboi Aug 06 '22

wounds healing by themselves?? crazy!!

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u/retiredinms Aug 07 '22

There are no period accounts of "Angel's Glow" at Shiloh. Shiloh NMP posted: Hey folks. Well, it seems that every couple of months this story rears it's ugly head. What are we talking about you ask? We are talking about the infamous legend of " The Glowing Wounds of Shiloh" or what some folks refer to as "The Angel's Glow."
We want to put this myth to rest right now...
We are not sure exactly how the glowing wounds myth at Shiloh got started, but there is no contemporary evidence from surgeons or soldiers that the park has located that refers to this phenomenon. Medical doctors at the time were unaware of bacteria or the cause of infection, but such a unique phenomenon would probably have been observed and commented on.
Apparently this phenomenon became associated with Shiloh when a young man, Bill Martin, was visiting the park in 2001 and heard someone talking about the glowing wounds. We do not know if the person he talked to was a park ranger or some other individual. We have no record concerning the person who spread this information in the park and none of the staff present today have any recollection of it.
The young man's mother who worked for the U. S. Department of Agriculture determined that there was a possibility that under certain circumstances the bacteria photorhabdus luminescens could infect wounds and cause them to glow. James Byrne, an Australian Microbiologist in a February 2011 article in the "Naked Scientist" refers to the angels glow in reference to soldiers wounds during World War I, but does not mention the American Civil War.
Bill Martin and his friend, John Curtis apparently conducted experiments and continued researching the phenomena. They apparently found a reference to a glowing wound in an injured leg by a German Doctor at the siege of Mannheim in 1820. The documentation for this is unclear since there is no record of the doctor's name and there is no record of a siege of Mannheim in 1820. The most likely environment for this phenomena would probably be World War I when soldiers were exposed to dirt in trenches and hypothermia conditions.
The press and others have promoted the story over the last few years and it has gained a great deal of attention but none of them have bothered to check with the park for documentation. If any eyewitness accounts are found we would be glad to examine them. Until then we must conclude that it could have happened but there is no evidence from eyewitnesses that it did.

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u/nilhaus Aug 06 '22 Silver

This is almost certainly a myth some students made up for their science fair. I’ve done research on it (Flaired civil war historian in askhistorian, and I was interviewed by NPR on this topic) and their is no contemporary evidence for this ever happening.

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u/[deleted] Aug 06 '22 edited Aug 12 '22

[deleted]

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u/Drill1 Aug 07 '22

My 3rd great grandfather lost his left arm and right eye at Shiloh. Nothing in our family history about his wounds glowing.

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u/Lone_Wolf_Forest Aug 07 '22

There is a case in an quarterly journal of science from 1821 where a man named Baron Percy documented phosphorescence wounds on wounded soldiers. It was before the Civil War but it was documented making it at least plausible that it could have happened in Shiloh. Pretty fascinating to read. Here’s the link:

https://books.google.at/books?id=ryxGAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA180&dq=%E2%80%9CPhosphorescence+of+wounds%E2%80%9D

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u/Kool-Aid-Man4000 Aug 06 '22

Yea I have a PhD in molecular biology and I can’t find a valid scientific source on this either. It’s basically just that high schoolers science project, which while cool for a high schooler is full of all sorts of holes. Scientifically they essentially have zero evidence for this being possible, and even based on what they propose I would say it’s a really really big stretch and I highly doubt it’s possible.

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u/Nurse_Neurotic Aug 06 '22

Yeah I’ve heard this whole story is pretty much bullshit too. Never happened.

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u/Losing_Face Aug 06 '22

Sometimes I think about how myths and folk tales start. Then I come to reddit and read about people that essentially came back to life with bioluminescent scars. Suddenly, zombies and other stuff seem completely rational and based in reality.

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u/Grafixflexx Aug 06 '22

I read something on reddit the other day about some resident evil-esque fluid that reanimated dead cells in pigs. Doesn't appear to bring back sentience though...definitely a case of just because we can doesn't mean we should!

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u/cdiddy19 Aug 06 '22

Except that it has implications that would help save body organs for transplant, which is a very limited source for humans.

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u/Little-Geri-Seinfeld Aug 06 '22

The implications....what are you looking at...you wouldn't be in danger.

So they are in danger!

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u/Warpzit Aug 06 '22

Zombies like guinea pigs being resurrected with microwaves from being stone frozen?

Or like humans/animals being infected with rabies?

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u/zDraxi Aug 06 '22 edited Aug 06 '22

Sometimes I think about how myths and folk tales start. Then I come to reddit and read someone changing "healing wounds" to "essentialy came back to life".

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u/movzx Aug 06 '22

Not even "healing wounds", just "cleaning out bad bacteria so you don't die from the wounds as they heal"

Maggots can do similar and are used in medical settings sometimes.

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u/More_Farm_7442 Aug 06 '22

I had a teacher in Jr. High (eons ago) that had a large scar on one hand and had lost function of a couple of fingers on that hand.

He was well known in the community and we learned from our parents(and grandparents) that this man had his hand severely injured in an accident when he was younger. The wounds became infected, and maggots were used to clean the wounds and save his hand. Doctors applied the maggots and covered his hand to hold them in place. Over days the dead tissue was eaten, the area sterilized and new tissue grew to heal the wound.

Those maggots saved his hand(for the most part), his arm and life.

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u/JarlaxleForPresident Aug 06 '22

But has a permanent case of heebie jeebies now

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u/More_Farm_7442 Aug 06 '22

lol I haven't heard "heebie jeebies" in ages and ages and ages!! My best "heebie jeebies" memory is about a lady in a mental hospital. lol When I was in college did an pharmacy internship at mental health clinic. Some lady had been admitted from the ER after acute water intoxication. (She'd drank a couple gallons of water causing a dilution of electrolytes and potential brain swelling.) When she was asked why she drank that much water, her answer was "I had the heebie jeebies". lol She was anxious and could only define it as a bad case of the heebie jeebies.

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u/ivanacco1 Aug 06 '22

Suddenly, zombies and other stuff seem completely rational and based in reality.

I recommend you read about the attack of the dead men in ww1

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u/HittingSmoke Aug 06 '22

Zombies are very much rooted in reality. Look up the very real horrors of rabies.

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u/Phokiss Aug 06 '22

No. That's not even remotely the same.

You kids are something else. Back in my day we at least knew our bullshit stoner comments were infact.. Bullshit.

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u/jessausorr Aug 06 '22

Source pls

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u/dragonti Aug 06 '22

Photorhabdus luminescens is the bacteria. It lives in parasitic nematodes that infest insects usually

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u/jessausorr Aug 06 '22

Cool, and I don't doubt that it exists. But that's not backing up this entire story about it magically healing a bunch of soldiers...

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u/dragonti Aug 06 '22

Sorry I thought you meant source in the sense of does this organism exist

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u/RedditWasFunIn2011 Aug 06 '22

Very well established legend in US Civil War battle history

Nothing magical about it beyond the bioluminesence

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u/hat-of-sky Aug 06 '22

Looking into it, the legend has no contemporary or pre-internet sources, and it's possible it was invented for the science project. The Shiloh website calls it a myth. They mention something about the idea perhaps coming from WWI, but I haven't found anything about that either.

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u/space0watch Aug 06 '22

Legend does not mean fact in regards to soldiers being healed

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u/1442190 Aug 06 '22

Trust me bro

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u/moreMalfeasance Aug 06 '22 edited Aug 07 '22

The worst thing you can do for your immune system is to coddle it. They need to fight their own battles.

Edit: If Sabre really cared about our well-being, they would set up hand de-sanitizing stations. A simple bowl at every juncture filled with dirt, vomit, fecal matter...

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u/smackythefrog Interested Aug 06 '22

Agreed. I say this exact line as I fart bare-assed on everyone's face and giving them Pink Eye.

It doesn't go over well, but they will thank me later.

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u/spamjavelin Aug 06 '22

Don't get me started on how coddled the modern anus is...

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u/Tasty_Commercial6527 Aug 06 '22

Ok. But if I ever saw somebody's wound glowing and stopping them from dying from a few days in the mud...

Fuck science I would be the most devout follower of whatever God those guys worship because they CLEARLY have figured it out the right way.

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u/CardinalFartz Aug 06 '22

Now that's a story you're gonna tell everybody and no one gonna believe you.

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u/systemisfailing Aug 06 '22

Bacteria is lit

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u/Lucie2213 Aug 06 '22

Where to buy that said bacteria?

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u/JarlaxleForPresident Aug 06 '22

Really good worm guy out of Pennsylvania. Why, who’s your worm guy?

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u/PumpUpTheValiumBro Aug 06 '22

Imagine how trippy this was back then when they didn’t know. I doubt many people even believed them.

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u/AshTheGoblin Aug 06 '22

Imagine seeing a guy that's been laying in the mud dead for 2 days get up with gaping wounds sealed by a celestial glow today. I wouldn't believe my own eyes and I know bioluminescence is a thing.

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